To What are We Listening?

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February 11, 2018

Mark 9:2-9

Who remembers playing telephone when you were younger?

Perhaps, you weren’t that young when you played it the last time. I have participated in playing telephone during leadership retreats. I have had the confirmation students play it before. It is a great exercise to determine who is really listening to the message that is being shared. It is a great game that creates laughs because the message that gets to the end of the line is almost never the same message that started the process. There are many factors that affect the transmission of the message. We are affected by the noise around us and the many distractions that vie for our time. The message can also be very different depending upon the source.

In the commotion of our lives and the constant clatter of noise that occurs in our society, we are reminded that God has sent Jesus and it is in Jesus that we are called to listen.

Jesus comes bearing a message of good news in a time of uncertainty. There is upheaval in Israel and concern for the occupation by the Romans. Jesus Christ is the good news. Born incarnate in a world that needs a sign of hope. A sign of hope that darkness will not vanquish the light. A sign of hope that the light will illuminate even the darkest corner.

It is on the mountain that Peter, James, and John are caught by surprise. They are in awe of the sights and sounds. Jesus is transfigured, or changed, right before them. They then encounter Moses and Elijah. Peter is so caught up in the whole event that he wants to stay on that mountain top. It is a glimpse of things to come, yet there is still much to be accomplished in Jesus’ ministry in his earthly life.

Peter is fooled into the temptation that everything has been accomplished. There is nothing more to do. His concern for the disciples that did not come up the mountain does not even exist. He is so eager to set up shop and stay here for eternity. He is listening to his own inner desire to live in the present moment and is not even contemplating the things to come.

Can you think of those moments in your life that you thought you had reached the top of the mountain and did not want to look down? Like Peter, it would have been nice to just build a dwelling and stay there for all of eternity. We have so many voices coming at us today that it is hard to decipher to what or to whom we should be listening. We are surrounded by the media (print, television, social) as well as very vocal individuals that want to make sure their voices are heard. Some of these voices are valid and others we have to sift through.

Advice maybe coming from those around us, however, we often want to do things our way. We fail to listen to those in our lives that may actually have some words of wisdom to share. There are two experiences I can point to in life when you do truly feel like you are on top of the mountain. Life could not get any better at that moment.

One instance is on your wedding day. It is something that you have been preparing for and the excitement builds up until the very day of the ceremony. Standing in front of the officiant and hearing the words that you are now married empowers you with the notion that you can conquer the world. That is, until you take off the rose-colored glasses. As those of us that are married can attest, marriage is not easy. It requires work. We do not stay up on that mountain top. Sure you may, for a short period of time. During the honeymoon period. Then life comes at you full blast and you must learn to listen to one another and build upon the foundation of your relationship.

The birth of a child can also be one of those times that you think you have reached the mountain top. I was present for the birth, by cesarean section, of both of our children. I recall having the same emotions each time. After a little scare during labor, seeing Emali being born healthy and full of life put me on top of the world. I made sure to hand out cigars, both real and bubblegum. The same emotions ran through me 18 months later when Kiefer was born. Let me tell you, babies remind you how real life is much sooner than coming off from the honeymoon! Then they become teenagers before you know it!

If we could have just went back up to that mountain top and stayed there.

Peter wants to stay on the mountain top as well. While a little unnerving to see Moses and Elijah at first, it is also pretty awesome. A glimpse of the kingdom of heaven that will come down to us.

Jesus does not let him stay. This glimpse that he has seen has forever changed him as well. While Jesus was being transfigured, I am sure that Peter started to experience a transformation in his own heart and mind once he fully got to understand the occasion.

We hear the voice from the cloud say, “This is my Son, the Beloved; listen to him!” A beautiful book end to our time after Epiphany. We first heard the voice from the cloud when Jesus was baptized, and once again it guides and instructs us to listen to Jesus.

It is in the listening that the disciples will continue walking with Jesus. In the listening they will begin to sense where their ministries will lead after Jesus has been crucified and resurrected three days later. The voice of the Trinity will not leave them. It is forever present and they must still their minds and hearts to listen to where they are being called in their ministry and begin fulfilling the great commission.

Jesus does not let us stay on that mountain either. The voice coming from the clouds to listen to Jesus is the same for us. It is a promise that God will be with us. What a reassuring fact as we prepare to enter the season of Lent. A season of repentance and turning back towards God.

We are called to come down from the mountain top and be the hands and feet of God in our world today. We come down to the valleys to walk with our brothers and sisters that need help.  We come down to be a voice for those whose voices are not being heard. When we come down, we must listen. When we listen, we must do it with our whole heart, mind, and soul. We must listen to our sisters and brothers that have been affected by racism. We must listen to our sisters and brothers that are dreamers and grew up with us. There are so many people that we can listen to. It is in these conversations that we can hear Jesus speaking. God is present among us, especially where we fail to look.

Igor Stravinsky said, “To listen is an effort, and just to hear is no merit. A duck hears also.”

Ernest Hemingway said, “When people talk, listen completely. Most people never listen.”

Part of being in relationship with others is listening. Actually, we should be listening much more than we choose to open our mouths. We find God in our relationships when we are open to the Spirit moving in and among us as we listen. The love that God shows for us through Jesus is a love that can grow exponentially through our relationship with others.

God not only loves us enough to send Jesus to bear the cross with unending love, but God loves us so much to listen as well. To listen to our struggles and challenges. To listen to our celebrations of joy. To listen to all that we raise up in our prayers and even in our anger. It is in that love that grace abounds.

Let us pray. Transforming God, you call us to listen. May we hear in your words, a prophetic message of love that transforms all of your children. May your call to listen provide the opportunity to open hearts and minds. May we listen more and be slow to judgement. May you continue to be the light that shines within us. Amen.

 

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2 thoughts on “To What are We Listening?

  1. seeingbreathingliving

    Such a simple insight..listening… and a real ministry that goes so underused in churches. We are so much quicker to fix and advise and preach…but not to listen and to really hear, see and understand… maybe why Jesus so often said ‘those who have ears let them hear’.

    Like

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