Being Drawn to Jesus

 

priest holding hostia
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

August 12, 2018

John 6:35, 41-51

When I was getting ready to enter fourth grade, I asked my parents if I could play football. I had played baseball for a couple of years and decided that I wanted to try a new sport. It didn’t take me long to realize that I did not like running as a fourth grader. Although, I would come to look forward to it as I got into my late twenties.

I begged my mother to let me not play because I disliked all the running and it seemed that whenever I did something wrong, the coach would make me run around the practice field. I remember the sobbing that took place in the back of the car and my mother’s words that I would finish what I started. I am proud to say that I did finish out the season and that I never put on a football uniform again!

This could also explain my fear of physical education in junior high and high school. I was not very good at team sports and when we would line up to be picked my anxiety would rise because I knew that I would be one of the last ones to be picked. This truly hurts when you are that age and did not do much for my self-confidence. I would focus more on academics and look for other ways to be part of something. This could be why I chose to play tennis in high school because at the most you were only on the court with one other teammate. While we may feel left out, Jesus draws us into himself, to love us and so that we can begin a relationship with God that will direct and guide our life.

This morning, it appears that Jesus is on the outside looking in. The Jewish leaders that have gathered turn hostile in our lesson as we work deeper into the sixth chapter of John. Unlike the other gospels, Jesus has no problem declaring that he is the son of God. He expands that image even more in this chapter by declaring that he is the bread of life. A bread that fills one for all of eternity.

The gathered leaders reject this notion. Jesus is the last one that they would choose to be on their team. His mother is Mary, and his father is Joseph. They know where he came from. It is ludicrous for him to say that he comes from God. However, Jesus does not let this detour him. He continues to say that those who are drawn to him will know God and will learn from God.

Jesus’ teaching in the synagogue is one that not only troubles the leaders gathered but it also speaks counterintuitively to their understanding of the Torah. This is not what they are expecting, and it is not what they are ready for. If Jesus is who he says he is, that means their authority is in question and that they must hand it all over to God. They are threatened by Jesus and do not understand how they will be drawn to him to get to know God. In their minds, they know who God is and for them, God is not in the image of Jesus that is standing in front of them. Things just are not adding up!

It is nice when everything adds up to a concise answer. Isn’t it?

Just ask an engineer or a mathematician. Everything must add up and be precise so that the answer is clear for all to see. For safety’s sake, we would like everything to add up, so planes stay up in the air and cars stay safely on the road. Because of this, we like the answers given to us. When we are confronted with the mysterious words of Jesus in this morning’s lesson, we are left scratching our heads. We too, like the Jewish leaders, are wondering how we are going to be drawn to Jesus. Some of us may get it. More power to you. Some of us catch glimpses of it and yet thirst and hunger for more. Did you know that for most of her life, Mother Theresa was constantly searching for God and felt at a lost? Some of us may just go along without attempting to further our spiritual journey and become complacent where we are.

We reject the things that are right in front of us. We reject those that try to help in times of need. We reject words of acknowledgement. We reject common sense. Now, I am not saying we all do this, but I am sure there are times that we could agree we hedge in that direction. Through our social culture, we have been told that we must be strong and independent. We have been told that it is weak to turn to others for help. Therefore, we crack under the pressure and respond in negative ways to our environments when faced with adversity. We are disturbed and threatened when we are told that we will be drawn in regardless.

In light of my experience in Phys. Ed. during junior high and high school, I would have loved to be drawn in. I would have loved the opportunity to not have to worry about when I would be picked to be on someone’s team.

This is what we find in Jesus! He comes to us willing to break down any barriers that may be in our way to knowing him in a fuller and deeper way. A way that leads us through any troubles and challenges that we may encounter. A way that leads to the foot of the cross and the waters of baptism where we experience a new birth. A birth that is like no other. A birth that washes us clean and sends us out into the world to proclaim the good news!

The notion of this is counter-cultural. The teachings of Jesus do not always coincide with the practices of this world. This is radical! In this radicalness, we experience a love that breaks us free from the chains that hold us back. The chains of our own sinfulness that we are called to repent of daily. This radical love meets us where we are.

Being drawn to Jesus Christ should provide a sense of comfort and fulfill the gospel promise that is given to us through our ancestors. We are drawn to Jesus not once though; we are drawn over and over again as we are reminded of his saving grace that was brought into the world to remind the world of the love that God has for all of creation. It is a love that knows no boundaries and a love that draws all of creation into the loving embrace of a God that knows where we are.

Being drawn to Jesus and learning from God is grace at work. It is a grace that walks with us in our journey to fully being in relationship with the creator whose image we reflect. It is a grace that meets us at the table and offers the body and blood of Christ so that we may encounter Jesus in the most intimate way possible and be filled so that we may share with others.

Let us pray. Drawing God, enable us to put down our guard and welcome your presence into our congregation, our families, and our lives. As you draw us to yourself, may we be open to encounter you in new and meaningful ways that gives us life and hope for things to come. Amen.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s