The Gospel of Inclusion by Brandan Robertson, Book Review

There are many books available on the market that explore what it means to be part of the LGBT+ community in the Church of Christ. Those that are opposed to full LGBT+ inclusion often use scripture to make their point known for all that will hear. In the process they often neglect that everyone is created in the image of God.

Brandan Robertson presents a well-researched proclamation as he advocates for a full inclusion of LGBT+ people in the church today. He brings to the forefront that we are all called to be in relationship with God and it is of great importance how we live out that relationship in the rest of our lives. He addresses the six “clobber” passages that have been used time after time to berate the LGBT+ community. These passages have always been taken out of context when used in this manner and as people of God, we have learned a lot as we grow into relationship with one another. Robertson writes, “Any relationship centered on a consensual commitment to sacrificial love for the good of another is a holy relationship, and any attempt to break that commitment is seen as less than God’s desire for humanity.”

This resource compliments his previous offering, True Inclusion, which discussed what it truly meant to be a welcoming church in the world today. Doing such, requires change among our thought patterns and the denigration of those that we see as different. This is not just true for the LGBT+ community, but also for immigrants, gender, race, and any other way that we as broken people decide to divide.

This is not an easy step for the church to take, because of the damage that has been done over time. The Gospel has been co-opted by humanity to use to its own advantage in various times and places. It is time to speak up and be bold in our proclamation. Robertson shares, “We must know that our silence is being complicit in oppression. Silence is opposed to the gospel. We must, in Christ’s name, speak up. We must be willing to sacrifice our positions of privilege, power, and comfort in order to lift up the oppressed and give the voiceless back their voices.”

There is redemption to be found in Christ and we are not called to get in the way of the Holy Spirit working among the people of God. We are called to love and inclusion. Brandan Robertson’s book shares this in a way that is full of wisdom as well as from a full heart that has experienced many things. It speaks boldly and calls us forth in love.

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Being in Relationship

Relationships take time to build. This is a point within life that is true no matter what profession you are in or where you live. Relationships are all around us, and yet we at times tend to hope they will just work out on their own.

As a pastor I don’t really have the luxury of just letting things be. It is through my relationship with God that I am called to be in relationship with the people of my congregation and eventually with the people in the community in which I reside. It is a lot of work though and does not come easy.

Prior experiences have helped as I enter into relationship with my new congregation and names are starting to come to me as I connect faces and names. The thought that God knows all of God’s children by name is overwhelming as I am starting to get to know just a few hundred people.  Being in relationship is much more than knowing names though. It is listening to stories and truly getting to know those around you that have a role in your life.

May God continue to be with us in this time of building and being in relationship. May we be guided by the Holy Spirit to get to know one another and listen to one another’s stories.

Fear Breeds Hate

Why is it that we are so often afraid of those things that we know little about? This weekend there are protests that are taking place near Muslim mosques around the country, most closely Dearborn, MI. Not only do these protests appear to be anti-Muslim, they are also being promoted by open-carry gun groups.

This does not speak to anything that Jesus would have promoted within his life or to this day. How does this reflect the idea that we should love our neighbors? ELCA Presiding Bishop, Elizabeth Eaton, questions this as she speaks in opposition to these protests:

“As Christians, we are freed in Christ to love and serve our neighbors. Today our neighbors include Muslims – upstanding faithful Americans. The enemy we face is not Islam but hatred and fear. I join my sisters and brothers in calling for gestures of solidarity with our American Muslim neighbors. Together we can witness to the world that God’s love will have the last word.”