Draw Near to Wonder

December 2, 2018 Advent 1

Luke 21:25-36

I grew up in the city. Fortunately, the city of Charlotte is not real big, and I lived just on the edge. Therefore, you could go in the back yard and not worry about the light pollution. This meant that whenever there was a meteor shower or comet,we could usually see the event unless it was cloudy. I would lay out in the yard and look up to the stars and wonder in amazement at how it was all created and wonder what existed beyond the earth.

Advent is a time of wonder. The promise of God is going to be fulfilled in Jesus and we anticipate being able to celebrate that very coming on Christmas. In our gospel lesson, Jesus encourages us to raise our heads to look beyond our pains and adversity, so that we can live in the hope and anticipation of his coming into the world.

The problem that we can run into is that we are so distracted with our lists and things that need to be done before Christmas arrives that we forget to wonder! Some of us may have even forgot what it meant to wonder many years ago. We get caught up in work and chores and running kids here and there that we lose the sense of wonder that comes into this world as a newborn baby.

This lesson from Luke seems to be a strange selection as we open up the Advent season. We are anticipating a newborn, and Jesus foretells of the time to come after he dies. The time Jesus speaks of does not sound like one we would get in line to participate in. Who wants to live among the fear and distress of the world? Yet,the gospel also reminds us to be ready at all times. No matter, what it is we are anticipating. Jesus tells those listening to, “Be on guard so that your hearts are not weighed down with dissipation and drunkenness and the worries of this life, and that day does not catch you unexpectedly” (vs 34). He was making sure that they were awakened from their own stupor. I am sure there were many that were walking around with their heads down and not paying attention to the things that were happening around them. They too, were distracted.

We are guilty of the very things that Jesus names. We worry about the day to day issues that affect our lives. We all become drunk in our own ways. That drunkenness could come in many forms. Being so caught up in one thing that we forget to do the things that truly matter. We let time slip away and with that we could spend more time with the people that we should be loving and caring for. We become drunk on those things that distract us from being in relationship with God and in turn fall short of living out that relationship with others.

In response to any distress that we may encounter, Jesus tells us that he will be present to bring us that sign of hope we are looking for. That sign that first came into the world with his birth. He calls us to raise our heads and look up to the signs and know that our redemption is drawing. It is a redemption that is found in Christ. We are redeemed through the grace of God through the blood and life shed on the cross.

While Jesus speaks of signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, we are also reminded of his presence. A presence that will never leave us. Even when the earth and the heavens pass away, his words will never pass away. His words of hope and redemption that comes to all of humanity are the ones that we look towards in wonder. A wonder that guides us and carries us through difficult times. While it seems that we will always have bad things happening around us, Jesus comes with the reminder to raise our heads and be courageous to face those adversities knowing that we are redeemed through his saving grace.

We are called into his presence to wonder. The wonder draws our heads up from the distractions and brings us closer to a loving God that chose to be born in this world so that we would know God’s love. To wonder, draws us near to the mystery of God. How are you going to wonder this Advent season?

Let us pray. God of Wonder, be our guiding star in these days of Advent as the day light gets shortened as well as our patience as we wrestle the lines at the stores. We rejoice as we begin to draw near to you in this time of waiting. Amen.

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Thank Goodness, Christ’s Kingdom is not from this World

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November 25, 2018 Reign of Christ Sunday

John 18:33-37

I am old enough to remember much of the fanfare that surrounded the wedding of Prince Charles and Diana in the early eighties. We have witnessed that again with Prince William’s and Prince Harry’s weddings. There is a fascination that surrounds the concept of royalty. Which, if you think about it is ironic. It was the first people that came over to America several hundreds of years ago that were trying to escape that very system of monarchy! And now you can buy collectibles to celebrate these weddings and the royalty that accompany it.

Our world is enamored with fame and the thought of being a celebrity. This can be easily manifested when we view the monarchy of our sisters and brothers in the United Kingdom. It is not just royalty that we look to, but anyone that we deem to be famous. And, it starts early! There are teenagers in the social media world that have become so popular, and have attracted so many followers, that their lives are changed and not always for the better. We like to lift people up and make them “king.” However, when we do this, we often forget that there was already one raised up for us. In Jesus Christ, we find a different way; a way that is not of this world but comes to love the world.

The idea of Jesus being made a king is not a random event in John’s gospel. In the first chapter, Nathanael is called by Jesus and Nathanael says to him, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!” (1:49) After feeding the five thousand, the people are enamored with the power and authority that Jesus encompasses. It is at this point that Jesus knows he must make his way to a different locale. “Perceiving then that they were about to come and taken him by force to make him king, Jesus withdrew again to the mountain by himself.” (6:15) When Jesus makes his final entry into Jerusalem, the crowd comes to welcome him, and “they took branches of palm trees and went out to meet him, crying out, ‘Hosanna! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, even the King of Israel!” (12:13)

The trouble occurs when we try to make Jesus into something that he is not. The Israelites did this very thing. Jesus caught them by surprise. They were anticipating a mighty warrior that was going to come and banish the Roman Empire and make all things new at that time. They were not expecting the unyielding love that Jesus bore for them and all of humanity. They were not expecting the savior of the world to go to the cross and die a gruesome death that was only used for the worst criminals.

It is easy for us to avoid the truth when there are so many other options available for us. Pilate represents the Roman Empire and he exercises his power through force. Surely, force is the only thing that is going to stop him. However, the power that Jesus comes into the world bearing is one of love. In that love, we are called to change. Our perception of reality shifts and our idea of authority is tilted on its head.

As we were reminded last week in the gospel of Mark, there will be birth pangs along the way. The shift to kingdom of God thinking is not easy. As Jesus says, his kingdom is not from this world. What a blessing that is! If his kingdom was from this world, we would not experience the evil and suffering that we do. If his kingdom was from this world, we would not hear of war, poverty, hunger, mass shootings, or the fear of others. There is hope in his kingdom not being of this world!

The disciples knew that there was something different about Jesus. As Nathanael reveals in the first chapter, there was an understanding that Jesus was the king of Israel. However, it was not a kingship like they had seen before. It is not a kingship like we have witnessed today. He expected no special treatment and did not regard himself as better than anyone else. He did not seclude himself from the people and was quite often seen eating with those in society that no one else would break bread. The Reign of Christ is one that is expressed through love. The love Christ shows for the world is reflected in the freedom that comes to all of humanity. That freedom includes the freedom from sin and the freedom from death. This freedom is everlasting and is a freedom that will not be found in any country or monarchy. It is a freedom that comes only to us through the sheer grace of God.

The grace of God comes to us born in our own likeness and walks alongside us. The grace of God brings us to the cross where we encounter the ultimate grace and love poured out for all. We are invited to be a part of this in the waters of baptism and every time we come to the Lord’s table.  It is in these gifts of the sacraments that we encounter our Lord, who is and who was and who is to come.

 

 

Living our Faith: Money

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November 11, 2018

Mark 12:38-44, 1 Kings 17:8-16

Who remembers the television show, Silver Spoons?

It aired in the early to mid-eighties and was about a wealthy business owner that finds out he has a 12-year old son, Ricky. The lifestyle that Ricky learns to become accustom was a major part of the show. I wanted that same lifestyle after watching the show, and in a way, I did have it. I did not need to worry about where food or the necessities of life came from. And quite often, if I wanted something, I would usually get it. This was great as a kid. However, it taught me very little about the value of money. As soon as I turned 16, I got my first job and spent money nearly as quickly as I earned it. I did have a savings account, but it was quite often in need of a little tender loving care. I may not have been completely greedy, but my priorities were not always in the right place.

The values that we learn growing up quite often follow us into adulthood. There is possibility for change. Surrounding ourselves with the right people makes a big difference and at times can require us to step outside of our comfort zone. It is here, that we can learn a lot from Jesus. While quite often we are concerned about the end game, are we going to get into heaven; Jesus is concerned about how we are living our life today.

This morning we are given the story of two widows. First, in 1 Kings, Elijah is instructed by the Lord to find the widow and ask her to provide him with sustenance so that he may continue in his travels. There is a little hesitancy on her part as she just has enough meal and oil to make a loaf of bread for herself and her son as they prepare to die because of the drought.

In our gospel lesson this morning, it is a widow that gives to the offering in the temple. She is not concerned with her appearance or anything of that sort. Her story is a counter to the one of the scribes at the beginning of the lesson. The scribes are more concerned about how they look, that they garner respect from others in the marketplace, and that they have the best seats in the synagogue and at the banquet tables. It is the scribes that take advantage of the widows of their time. It appears that their chief concern is the light that shines on them. The scribes’ greed overshadows any concern that they may possibly have for their neighbors.

So, when we think about greed in our society today, it is nothing new. Greed stems back to the beginning of humanity. Many of our problems today can be rooted in the greed that is fostered within our culture and the lack of care that is shown for the least in society. Our society is only going to be made better when we reach out and help our fellow brothers and sisters when they need it the most. Greed is not healthy, and it strains the very fabric of our beings. It is witnessed throughout society and one popular film I grew up watching is full of greed. That film is Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, of course, the older version with Gene Wilder. The children portrayed in the movie are all about the greed: Augustus Gloop cannot get enough chocolate; Violet Beauregarde needs to have a piece of chewing gum because she thinks she is entitled to it; Veruca Salt wants a golden goose and she wants it now; Mike Teavee needs to be in the spotlight. Charlie Bucket is not immune to the greed either as him and Grandpa Joe can’t stop their desire to try the Fizzy Lifting Drinks.

Yet, it is Charlies actions that are like the widow in the gospel lesson that he hands everything back over to Willy Wonka. His family’s future could have been all made if he just took the everlasting gobstopper to Mr. Slugworth!

Jesus is the one that speaks up for the children, widows, and those on the fringes of society. The widow placing her two coins into the offering plate reflects the love that she has for God, because she knows she is loved. It is the same with the widow that is willing to give all she has to Elijah. In their faith, they trust that there will be enough. Shane Claiborne makes the comment in our series we have been using, that “God made enough for everyone’s need, not enough for everyone’s greed.”

We are all here this morning because of our faith. A faith that has been instilled within us from the time we encountered the Holy Trinity in the waters of baptism. In Jesus’ death and resurrection, we are reassured of new life and every time we encounter communion, we are reminded of Jesus’ saving grace and his love for us. May we remember his generosity as we give freely of ourselves.

Let us pray. God of love, we give thanks for the stories of the widows in our lessons this morning. May their devotion and faith be a foundation for us to build our faith. May our generosity come through the love that we have for you. Amen

Living Our Faith: Community

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November 4, 2018 All Saints Day

John 11:32-44

“In Louisville, at the corner of Fourth and Walnut, in the center of the shopping district, I was suddenly overwhelmed with the realization that I loved all these people, that they were mine and I theirs, that we could not be alien to one another even though we were total strangers. It was like waking from a dream of separateness, of spurious self-isolation in a special world. . . . 

This sense of liberation from an illusory difference was such a relief and such a joy to me that I almost laughed out loud. . . . I have the immense joy of being man, a member of a race in which God Himself became incarnate. As if the sorrows and stupidities of the human condition could overwhelm me, now that I realize what we all are. And if only everybody could realize this! But it cannot be explained. There is no way of telling people that they are all walking around shining like the sun.

Then it was as if I suddenly saw the secret beauty of their hearts, the depths of their hearts where neither sin nor desire nor self-knowledge can reach, the core of their reality, the person that each one is in God’s eyes. If only they could all see themselves as they really are. If only we could see each other that way all the time. There would be no more war, no more hatred, no more cruelty, no more greed. . . . But this cannot be seen, only believed and ‘understood’ by a peculiar gift.”

This quote from Thomas Merton comes from his book, Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander. It provides a vision of what we want to see in a community. The realization of everyone living together as one. In Jesus Christ, we are called to live together in community with our brother and sisters, loving and supporting the other.

We can come to the realization that Thomas Merton does, however, we first encounter brokenness and despair. For the people of Bethany, the people are mourning the loss of Lazarus. Mary and Martha are at a loss because they were hoping that Jesus may come to help heal their brother the same way that he has healed many others throughout the countryside. It is Mary that we hear say to Jesus, “If only you were here!” Mary knows Jesus and the power and authority to heal and if he would have been present at the time her brother died, he would still be alive. In the brokenness that the community of Bethany has encountered, doubt begins to set in and people begin to wonder if Jesus truly is able to do the things he has promised. In a way, they have excluded Jesus from their community and set their sites on the truth that Lazarus is dead.

It is easy for us to exclude people from community. We don’t invite them in. We ignore them. Amid this, we experience brokenness. At times it appears our communities are torn apart. It can happen at any time. It can happen during natural disasters, like hurricane Michael in Florida. It can happen in mass shootings like at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh a little over a week ago. We are bombarded with reminders that heaven has not came to earth yet and that our world is still full of evil. From the outside, it appears that communities are easily shattered.

Despite the evil that pervades us, communities are present to raise up those that need a boost. We may quickly hear of the death and destruction, but the community that is quite often raised up from it is even greater. Communities are made stronger as they struggle together and look for a sense of belonging, safety, companionship, and relationship. New communities, or at least new realizations of communities, have arose time and time again out of the death and destruction that we quite often hear of through the news. The communities that come through these struggles are transformed into a new thing as they grow and are challenged. They get better together.

While Jesus raises Lazarus from the dead, the community rejoices. It is a sign of God’s saving grace that has come to reside in their community. It is a chance to witness Jesus and the healing he is bringing to the world. Jesus does not unbind Lazarus, he calls the community to work together to unbind him. It is God coming to live among mortals as we read in Revelation.

The church is a place of community if we are open with one another and support one another in our struggles and temptations. We can be present for one another when we do not know where else to turn. We can bring love and support in the name of Jesus Christ.

If we are honestly following the word of God, we are brought to a sense of community as we learn to love our sisters and brothers. The city of Pittsburgh has come together in the aftermath of the shooting last weekend at Tree of Life and the local Islamic center had raised over $70,000 in the first few days following the tragedy. The communities in Florida devastated by Hurricane Michael are banding together to support one another along with disaster relief organizations throughout the country.

In Richmond, we practice living in community by supporting MCREST, and working with our neighbors from other churches. Community comes in many forms. Thomas Merton’s vision of seeing each other as God sees us, is what living into community is all about. As he says, if we did see everyone this way, “There would be no more war, no more hatred, no more cruelty, no more greed.”

It is in the promise of the Resurrection, that Jesus welcomes us to a new life. A life surrounded by all the saints that have gone before us. A life that is brimming over with the goodness of God and we are embraced for eternity.

Let us pray. God, you draw us in to community to be with one another so that we may see Christ in our sisters and brothers. May you continue to be present with us in our brokenness and provide a peace that comes by gathering together. Amen.

 

You Will Be Free Indeed!

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October 28, 2018 Reformation Sunday

John 8:31-36

As many of you know, I grew up in a town that was just a little bigger than Richmond. It lacked diversity, much like Richmond. And honestly, there was little to do in town, so we would quite often drive to Lansing on the weekends to go shopping or see a new movie that our little theater in town would most likely not get.

I don’t think I was much different from most people when I looked forward to getting out of the town to seek my own freedom. As soon as I got my drivers license and my own car I was able to go anywhere that I wanted. My parents even trusted me enough to drive all the way down to Cincinnati without adult supervision. When I decided to attend Central Michigan University, it was an hour and a half from home and it meant I would have the greatest freedom yet!

That freedom also came with responsibility. There were times when I questioned the freedom that I sought when I would have little money and things were just not going the way that I expected them to. The freedom that we often desire when we are younger is a false sense of freedom. It is only in Jesus Christ that we find true freedom that cannot be found elsewhere.

The Israelites think that they have it all made. They believe that everything is alright in their lives and that there is no where else they need to turn. They have not been held captive like their ancestors and all they have seen and encountered is freedom. Yes, their land may be under Roman rule, but they have been given the freedom to worship the way they choose. As long as they do not disturb those in authority. Thus, Jesus coming onto the scene is a big warning sign for them. His actions and words are starting to stir up the people and thus the freedom in which they thought they had. In truth, it is not a freedom that is anchored in the truth of God. Their sense of freedom does not reside in the truth of God, rather it resides in their own personal doing.

This was the same issue that Martin Luther had over 500 years ago now with the leaders of the church. They attempted to control everything and did not leave room for the truth that is Jesus Christ. They attempted to control grace when it was not theirs to control. They began to judge others when it was not in their right to judge.

While we think we may be free today, I am sure that you too at one point or another have been captive by some ill devised thought. We like to test the boundaries of our perceived freedom. We like to think that we are in control when really the only thing that we can control is our own personal actions. We make the decision to follow Christ and in the midst of that, there are always other distractions that attempt to steer us away from Christ. The sin that steers us away from Christ is evil. It distracts us and pulls us away from the word of God. It holds us captive in its grasp and yet, Jesus reminds us that he is present to release us from its grip.

Each and everyone of us are called to be in a relationship with Jesus Christ. Like our day to day relationships, we sometimes get out of line and make bad decisions. Despite our bad decisions, the word of God never leaves us. It is present for us to turn to in our time of need and be the foundation for us to rest in when our faith is troubled. It is in the power of the word that Martin Luther realized that we are justified by grace in our faith alone. While others may attempt to judge us, it is only in God that we must answer. While others may sometimes look at us differently, it is probably because we are following the word of Jesus Christ and walking in the way as his disciples.

As our faith grows in the word of God, we are led to freedom from the powers of sin and death. While it is in the powers of sin and death that enslave. We must learn to place our trust in our faith and the freedom found in the truth. For when we place our trust in sin, we are not free. Whenever we place our trust in death, we are not free. It is the truth that will set us free. That freedom was found in Jesus Christ for the disciples and is where we find our freedom today. It is not in our ability to move away from home. It is not in being able to decide whatever we want to do. It is in following Jesus and the way in which he is calling us to journey.

It was through Martin Luther’s revelation in the word, that he found a freedom that he had been missing. A freedom that had went on hiatus from the teaching of the church. In this revelation he saw the need to re-form the church. While Luther found this revelation in the letter to the Romans, a movement was started to bring the gospel of Jesus Christ to the people. A gospel message that is full of grace and mercy. A gospel message that gives us freedom like we could never experience in our earthly treasures, but only embrace in a truth that sets us free. The wonderful thing is that this freedom is not just for us. If it is true for us, it is true for all of humanity. Our God welcomes all of creation into relationship and the freedom that comes in knowing the truth found in Jesus Christ our Lord.

Let us pray. Ever re-forming God, you have created us, yet are far from finished in seeing us grow as disciples called to live out your word. May we be shaped by your truth so that we can embrace the freedom that can only be found in you. Amen.

Living Our Faith: Service

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October 21, 2018

Mark 10:35-45

Whether you choose to admit it or not, I am sure that many of you have a guilty pleasure television show. A show in which you can escape your life and immerse yourself into television for an hour or two. Many of our current television choices have extended into the realm known as reality television. We live vicariously through watching others live their lives, face their fears, or strive for success.

I admit that I enjoy Survivor and The Amazing Race and have imagined myself competing on them. You may enjoy American Idol, The Voice, Dancing with the Stars, America’s Got Talent, Big Brother, The Bachelor or The Bachelorette, or one of the many other ones that are too numerous to name. If you think about it, all these shows are competitions and the goal is to determine who is the greatest. It could be the greatest talent, greatest singer, greatest strategist, or greatest dancer. There can be a desire to be lifted above our peers and be selected as the greatest. Of course, this just doesn’t happen on reality television, but also in the Olympics, sport leagues, and even intellectually, like Jeopardy.

Now, I am not saying there is anything wrong with this, but it can lead us away from the teaching of Jesus. Jesus came to serve and through his teaching we are called to go out and be the change we want to see in the world that reflects heaven on earth.

This morning in our gospel lesson from Mark, we encounter James and John approaching Jesus asking that they be able to sit at his right and left hand in his glory. You can imagine that this starts some grumbling among the other disciples. Why do James and John think that they are better then everyone else? What gives them the right to be able to sit in positions of authority once Jesus has reached his glory?

Maybe we have it all wrong. It could be that their intentions are not really that bad. Perhaps their ambition should be applauded. Maybe they just want to show Jesus how much dedication that they have for the mission that they have been called and want to ensure that he is aware of it. In this are opportunities for the disciples to learn and for Jesus to teach. Jesus shares what it will truly mean to follow him into the reign of God.

This attitude did not begin with the disciples, and it did not end there either. All we must do is think back on some of those reality shows, and it is easy to witness the egotistical arrogant attitude of many contestants, hoping to become the greatest. The last thing that is on the mind of many of them is to serve their opponents. There will always be contests and games, but the question that should always be in the forefront of our mind, is how do we treat our opponents, either win or lose? Do we show them love as Jesus would have? Are we willing to serve them in their time of need?

Jesus was not into competition. As he states in our gospel lesson, “For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.” Jesus provided many examples for us of what it means to love our neighbors and serve them when they are in need. Jesus was always welcoming the stranger and those that were on the outskirts of society, as he talked and ate with them. Along with this, he lifted up the children and their open minds as something to model. He reached out to heal those that were sick. He was endlessly teaching the disciples and those that would gather in their midst to hear what it was he had to say. He washed the disciple’s feet. He ultimately went to the cross to show the love that he had for all of humanity. Through his death, he gave up his life and saved us from our sins. In his resurrection, we are reminded of the grace of God.

In the endless service that Jesus did, there was a love that flowed from him to all of those that he touched. Encompassed in that love is the same love and kindness that we can share with our friends, neighbors, and even the stranger.  The sharing of that love starts in our own neighborhood.

This short video is a great example of what it means to serve those in our own neighborhood.

This video was also a reminder that we do not have to be the greatest. If we care for others and reach out when they are in need, we will encounter the reign of God here on earth. Christian service is about loving one another well, and as people serve others the world gets a glimpse of God.[i]

There are many ways that we have an opportunity to get that glimpse of God here at Trinity. We glimpse God through the mission trips our Mission Team makes to Haiti, the food packing event through Kids Against Hunger, our Bicycle Ministry, donating food to the food pantry, and especially through MCREST which begins this evening as we welcome 30 homeless gentlemen into our congregation for a week.

I have also witnessed glimpses of God in you, our confirmands as we have had some great conversations in class; I have seen you interact with others at camp; and as you have served in many ways over the past couple of years. You do not have to be the greatest, because you have deemed great in the eyes of Christ. I pray that you continue to extend that same love to others.

Let us pray. God of love, you have called us to acts of service so that we may reach out to our communities with love. May we continue to serve our sisters and brothers alike, with the same love you share with us. Amen.

 

 

 

[i] Enuma Okoro, Animate Practices video series, Augsburg Fortress, 2014.

Living Our Faith: Sacraments

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October 14, 2018

Hebrews 4:12-16

I would like you to stop and think for a minute about the practices in your life that you have held close to your heart. Those things that you have looked forward to on a regular basis. Perhaps they have even shaped who you are today.

One such practice in my life became an annual tradition while I was still living at home with my parents. I was fortunate enough to grow up with an in-ground pool. The pool was a source of fun and laughter throughout the summer. To take a refreshing dip in the pool after mowing the yard was something that I looked forward to. Having friends over and not having to worry about anything on a hot summer day was glorious. For my family, pool season always opened on Memorial Day! Regardless of the weather. Pool season began when I would boldly jump in and break through the surface of the water for the first time. There were Memorial Days where I would enjoy the water and stay in as long as possible because it was eighty degrees out. There were other days that I would jump in and could not get out quick enough because it was barely in the fifties.

This became a spiritual practice for me and the water reinvigorated me after the endless cold of living through another mid-Michigan winter. There is also the obvious connection of the water to our sacramental practice of baptism. In the waters of baptism, we are washed clean and receive the grace of God.

This second week of the Living Our Faith series brings us to the topic of sacraments.

While sacraments are commonly associated with religious ritual, that was not always the case. The word sacrament originally derived from the Latin word, sacramentum, and was used by the Romans when sending soldiers out to war. It was the most serious vow someone could make, to put one’s life up for the empire. There are rituals that happened long before that through the Christian churches own Jewish ancestry. Rituals are important and play an important role in forming community.

It is easy to partake in our modern sacraments. Especially when we don’t always fully understand the promises we are making. We can take them for granted and not fully live into them as God has intended for us. It is through the word of God that the sacraments embody the Holy whenever we baptize or whenever we come to the Lord’s Table to feast. The word of God does not come lightly. In our reading from Hebrews, the author writes, “Indeed, the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing until it divides soul from spirit, joints from marrow; it is able to judge the thoughts and intentions of the heart. And before God no creature is hidden, but all are naked and laid bare to the eyes of the one to whom we must render an account.”

When we approach the table every week, we are naked before God.  All our vulnerabilities are laid bare and our actions are not invisible. God knows us and desires for us to be one with the Spirit. God wants us to be vulnerable. Not just with God, but in all our relationships. God wants us to be our true selves and to live into the reign of God.

The sacraments have not always been administered properly in the church and some have chosen to use them to their advantage as leverage or control. However, it is impossible to place limits on God. The moment that we try, God breaks through the fence, knocks down the wall, or clears the way for anything that may lay in God’s path.

God’s call for us this morning is to do the same!

Once again, we hear in the letter to the Hebrews, “Let us therefore approach the throne of grace with boldness, so that we may receive mercy and find grace in time of need.” Jesus has led the way for us to approach the sacraments with a boldness that reflects our faith. A faith that lifts Christ up as our companion that can be with us in our weaknesses and cheers us on in our strengths. To be bold and confident as we are reminded of the baptismal waters that washed over us, and to eat and drink of the body and blood of Christ which brings us to full communion with God.

The following clip from the movie, Phenomenon, is an example of how Christ works in us through the power of God’s word in the sacraments.

Like the apple, when we eat of the bread and drink of the wine, Jesus becomes a part of us. Jesus is present with us and restores us. This is the grace of God at work in a world that is often at odds with itself. We are reminded of Christ’s death on the cross and the life that he has given for all of humanity. Through the sacraments, God’s word is active and thriving. God’s word fills our hearts, minds, and souls so that we may fully live into a relationship that is comprised of love and compassion.

The practices that we live in the sacraments are an outward and visible sign of God at work in the world today. All are invited to be a part of that work. To be washed clean in the ever-flowing waters; to feast on the bread of life. In these, we encounter a God that knows no boundaries and has broken down walls so that all may experience the reign of God.

Let us pray. Living and active God, you have initiated the commands for us to be baptized and to share in your body, broken for us. In the waters and at the table, may we be renewed and experience your loving grace in our lives. Amen.